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5 Most disheartening Ashes moments

Ashes is remembered for some of the most inspired and memorable performances but it has seen the dark days as well.

Steve Smith, Captain of Australia and Joe Root News
Steve Smith, Captain of Australia and Joe Root, Captain of England. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)

The much-hyped and famed Ashes Test series between traditional rivals Australia and England kicked off at the Gabba in Brisbane. It is the most fiercely fought series between the two oldest Test playing nations and the action has always at the peek in the last 70 years. Both the teams have not backed down from opting for dirty tactics and game play to ensure a win.

Ashes is remembered for some of the most inspired and memorable performances but it has seen the dark days as well. And while the 2017-18 series intensifies, we bring to you 5 most disheartening moments from the folklore over the years.

1. Leg Theory vs Bodyline

Bodyline
Bert Oldfield is hit on the head by Harold Larwood bowling Bodyline at Adelaide in 1933. (Photo Source: Twitter)

The 1932-33 Ashes series witnessed two new theories adopted by the teams that came into play. While England dubbed it as “leg theory”; Australia called it “Bodyline”, with a few select curse words thrown in. It is easily the most controversial tactic in Ashes, if not cricket, history.

Designed specifically to combat the threat of Australian batting genius Don Bradman, the leg theory involved the ball being bowled toward the body of the batsman in line with the leg stump, hoping that any deflections would be snaffled by the quadrant of fielders waiting behind square leg.

However, the new tactic proved costly for Australia’s wicketkeeper Bert Oldfield, who was knocked unconscious by a bodyline ball from England’s Harold Larwood. Following the incident, Aussie skipper Bill Woodfull had said: “There are two sides out there. One is playing cricket and one is not.”

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