Cheteshwar Pujara explains why teams find it difficult to win in overseas conditions these days

Cheteshwar Pujara explains why teams find it difficult to win in overseas conditions these days

Over the past 24 months, India has lost Test series in England, South Africa, and New Zealand.

Cheteshwar Pujara
Cheteshwar Pujara. (Photo Source: Twitter)

One of the biggest challenges that Test cricket poses is versatility. It not only challenges a batsman or a bowler’s ability to rise to the challenge in obscure conditions, but it also tests a team, as a whole. This is why the West Indian team of the 1980s and the Australian teams of the late 1990s and the entirety of the 2000s are a benchmark for every future side to follow.

Not only these sides won in the familiar comforts of their home conditions, but they also did brilliantly in adverse conditions. India’s recent drubbing in New Zealand (0-2) was another reminder as to why there is no ‘the team’ in world cricket recently.

While the Men in Blue won in Australia (2-1 in 2018), the World’s No.1 ranked side have lost Test rubbers in South Africa, England and New Zealand. Cheteshwar Pujara opened up on the reasons as to why teams are finding it so difficult to win in overseas conditions in the current era.

You are not getting too many quality Test players, says Pujara

According to the gritty Indian No.3 batsman, the increased focus on white-ball cricket has led to diminished production of ‘world-class’ Test cricketers. The Indian No.3, who was instrumental in the Men in Blue winning their maiden Test series in Australia, gave the example of the Big-3- India, Australia, and England- were compared to the talent pool currently as opposed to ten years ago.

“The importance of limited-overs cricket has increased significantly. You are not getting too many quality Test players. Earlier, there was a lot of importance given to a Test series. Players used to take ample rest before that. Now we see so many injuries during the season,” Cheteshwar Pujara was quoted as saying by Hindustan Times.

“If you look India, Australia, England, the pool of players will be no more than 20-25 whereas if you talk about 10 years ago, India used to have 30-50 players who were ready for Test cricket. I am not saying there are no players available. But if they are ready for Test cricket or not, that is the question,” added Pujara.

Over the past 24 months, India has lost Test series in England, South Africa, and New Zealand. Pujara said the batsmen’s shot selection could have been better in New Zealand where they were completely outplayed.