Club cricket to resume in Australia for the first time since COVID-19 outbreak

Club cricket to resume in Australia for the first time since COVID-19 outbreak

The Darwin and District Cricket Competition season is set to begin with a T20 tournament from June 6 in Australia.

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – (Photo by Jason McCawley – CA/Cricket Australia/Getty Images)

The sporting scenario has been put to a halt due to COVID-19 outbreak and the whole world is currently battling against the coronavirus pandemic. Over 3 lakh deaths have been registered so far in the world and the world is currently trying to curb the effects of coronavirus pandemic.

The resumption of football– Bundesliga– was a ray of hope for sports fanatic who were eagerly waiting for the resumption of sporting activity. Talking about cricket, competitive cricket is set to resume in Australia for the first time since the COVID-19 outbreak. The Darwin and District Cricket Competition season is set to begin with a T20 tournament from June 6 in Australia.

However, in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak, cricketers will not be allowed to use sweat or saliva in order to shine the ball. Darwin Cricket Management (DCM) is still trying to come up with various other options for shining the ball. There’s a possibility of umpires using a wax applicator for shining the ball.

“The ICC is working really closely with all the cricket bodies around the world in terms of finding new ways,” DCM chair Lachlan Baird told ABC Grandstand.

“We’re confident we will have clear guidelines from CA with what is and isn’t going to be allowed.”

“Some consideration is now being given to whether things like that wax applicator will become part of cricket’s new normal. And whether it will move way from the ball being shined a dark mysterious art that happens in the outfield to a more formalised process that happens with the umpires being involved,” he added.

Cricket fraternity was left divided over the ban on using saliva and sweat

The cricket fraternity was left divided after it was suggested that bowlers should be banned from using sweat and saliva for shining the ball. However, the usage of wax would be a far safer and hygienic process amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Australian pace duo of Pat Cummins and Josh Hazlewood have also stated that shining the red ball is inevitable as it maintains a balance between bat and ball. To tackle the usage of saliva and sweat, ball manufacturer Kookaburra last month suggested using a pocket-sized sponge applicator to apply wax on the ball.