Color Blind Awareness group urges ECB to reconsider the use of pink ball

Color Blind Awareness group urges ECB to reconsider the use of pink ball

The first Test between the England and the West Indies was played under the lights.

Pink ball India
Detail photograph of a pink ball. (Photo by Chris Hyde – CA/Cricket Australia/Getty Images)

England took a major step towards the development of cricket in the country as they successfully hosted the first D/N Test. The match was played between the hosts and the West Indies which saw England emerge victoriously by an innings and 209 runs. However, amidst the progress, the England and Wales Cricket Board have been accused of discriminating with color binds by granting pink ball cricket in the country.

The pink ball has been introduced by the ICC as a replacement for the usual white ball that is used in day-night encounters. According to the board, it will help them bring back the craze surrounding the longest format of the game which has taken a major blow with the rise of the high-intensity T20 format.

The first Test between the England and the West Indies was played under the lights. The next two Tests of the three-match series will be played in the day.

The main story:

If Daily Telegraph reports are to believed, a letter from campaign group Color Blind Awareness has requested the authorities of England and Wales Cricket Board to review the use of the pink ball. According to reports, the ball is difficult to spot by the cricketers as well as the spectators.

CBA founder Kathryn Albany-Ward pointed out that as many as 3 million people are color blind in the United Kingdom and therefore using the pink ball is not a wise decision.

“In the UK there are approximately three million people with color blindness. So, it would be extremely difficult to argue that it is reasonable to use a pink ball when so many people are potentially adversely affected,” CBA founder Kathryn Albany-Ward.

The Birmingham Test between England and West Indies was the 5th D/N Test in the history of cricket. The first day-night Test match roots back to the year of 2015 and was played in Adelaide between Australia and New Zealand.