'If England bowlers stay patient, there'll be a cluster of wickets somewhere' - Michael Vaughan predicts an India collapse at The Oval

‘If England bowlers stay patient, there’ll be a cluster of wickets somewhere’ – Michael Vaughan predicts an India collapse at The Oval

The fourth Test is poised with India trailing by 56 after England managed to take a 99-run lead.

Michael Vaughan
Michael Vaughan. (Photo Source: Getty Images)

England’s Ashes-winning captain Michael Vaughan feels that India would collapse on Day 3 of the fourth Test at The Oval if England bowlers can stay patient for the wickets. He stated that England bowlers have been “all over” the Indian batters.

Notably, the current five-match series has already witnessed plenty of collapses, with England being tumbled out for just 120 at Lord’s followed by India being undone for 78 at Headingley. The visitors suffered another collapse in the third Test, where they were bowled out for 278 after resuming 215/2 overnight.

“This four-man seam attack that England have, they have been all over this Indian batting line-up. We saw it in the second innings at Headingley. The Indians made it tough, they hung in there, then there was a collapse. I do think that if England stays patient, I do think there will be a cluster of wickets somewhere,” Michael Vaughan said on BBC’s Test Match Special podcast.

The fourth Test is poised with India trailing by 56 after England managed to take a 99-run lead. India went 43 at the loss of no wicket on stumps on Day 2.

The ball will swing more in the first hour: Michael Vaughan

Vaughan stated that Indian openers Rohit Sharma and KL Rahul would have a crucial role to play.

“The first hour is the key. It will swing more in the first hour. In terms of Rohit Sharma and KL Rahul, they have got the gift to be able to see off those balls that are bowled into that channel,” Michael Vaughan added.

He also had advice for the Indian batters, as he suggested that they should ensure not chasing the ball or poking the deliveries outside the off stump. Indian batters have been constantly troubled by the deliveries pitched in the fourth or fifth stump line.

“We have seen continuously throughout this series how the England seamers are good enough to be able to control that channel. If they go chasing that channel too early when the ball is moving around, they will probably snick to the cordon,” Michael Vaughan signed off.