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Paul Collingwood feels like playing International Cricket yet again after retirement

That anxiety and that intensity and all those things when you play for your country and they all come back again: Colly

Paul Collingwood
Paul Collingwood. (Photo by Nathan Stirk/Getty Images)

England and Durham veteran, Paul Collingwood, revealed that he came out of last net session feeling like he is back to the grind of International cricket with the same level of anxiety and excitement surrounding it. The English all-rounder last represented his country back in 2011 against Ireland before calling it quits from International cricket.

Collingwood, 41, recently became the oldest player to score in T20Is. He also captained the side during their famous T20 World Cup win in 2009 in the Carribean.

“I am very proud, I can tell you right now. I came out of the net session yesterday and it felt like I was playing international cricket again. That, to me, when I retired back in 2011 and to have that same feeling again, that anxiety and that intensity and all those things when you play for your country and they all come back again,” claimed the Durham legend.

After Pakistan defeated the World XI side in the opening match of the 3-match T20I series, Collingwood stated that it takes time for all World XI side to gel together.

“You know, when a World XI comes together, it takes some time to know each other and certainly Faf du Plessis (the captain) understands the players’ role in the team, what kind of tactics he is going to use when players are coming on to bowl. It’s not to going to gel immediately,” justified Paul Collingwood according to Wisden India.

On his knock 12 years back

He then took us back 12 years ago when England toured Pakistan during the Lahore Test where he missed out on his ton by a whisker.

“I scored runs here, I think I scored 90-odd (in the Lahore Test) against Shoaib Akhtar, a very quick bowler. I have got good memories from here, it was a shame I did not go on to get me a hundred,” concluded ‘Colly’.

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