Cheteshwar Pujara’s intent to score runs is plaguing him: Aakash Chopra

Cheteshwar Pujara’s intent to score runs is plaguing him: Aakash Chopra

Cheteshwar Pujara made three runs in the first innings of the 2nd Test.

Aakash Chopra and Cheteshwar Pujara
Aakash Chopra and Cheteshwar Pujara. (Photo Source: Instagram and Getty Images)

The struggle of the Indian batters continued in the second Test against South Africa as well. KL Rahul, who is captaining the team in the absence of Virat Kohli elected to bat after winning the toss. Rahul came out to open the innings along with Mayank Agarwal. But, the story of day one for India would be the lean patch of both Cheteshwar Pujara and Ajinkya Rahane which chased them in this game as well.

Pujara came out to bat after Marco Jensen dismissed Mayank in the 15th over. Pujara tried to get in the rhythm initially and it looked like he might have found the recipe to score some big runs in the game. However, Duanne Olivier proved everyone wrong after he managed to dismiss Pujara for three runs in the 24th over.

Pujara couldn’t judge the extra bounce of that delivery and it was caught by Temba Bavuma standing in the gully. Olivier dismissed Rahane on the next delivery to make it two in a row and put India in a dangerous position. During the lunch break on day one, former Indian opener, Aakash Chopra mentioned that both Pujara and Rahane failed to judge the bounce and pace.

Pujara has got a lot of patience and ability to defend as well. But two things are plaguing him. First is his intent to score runs,” Chopra said on Star Sports.

“He is not even hitting the half volley with full might and we can an uncanny pattern in his dismissals. He had nicked Ngidi’s delivery in the first innings of the Centurion Test. If we look at his hands and the height of the delivery, why is he even trying to play off the front foot instead of using the depth of the crease,” Chopra added.

Bowlers are going to enjoy bowling against you if you are always lunging forward with low hands: Aakash Chopra

Chopra further added that on South African pitches, bowlers find it easy to bowl against a batter who lunges forward with low hands.

“If you are always lunging forward with low hands, bowlers are going to enjoy bowling against you on South African pitches. Extra bounce, low hands, lunging forward… that’s a recipe for disaster,” he added.