Glenn McGrath criticizes Australian batters for their defensive game on day 2 of pink ball Test

Glenn McGrath criticizes Australian batters for their defensive game on day 2 of pink ball Test

Glenn McGrath reckoned that their batters only allowed the Indian bowlers to dominate.

Glenn McGrath
Glenn McGrath. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)

Day 2 of the first Day-Night Test match between India and Australia ended with Australia getting bundled up on just 191 runs. The Australian came with a defensive batting show, which had runs coming at a rate lower than two runs per over. The batters faced 28 balls to bring the first run of their innings. In light of the same events, former Australian great Glenn McGrath has launched a criticism attack on his team’s batters.

Hosts were reeling at 92/5 after the end of 48 overs. Putting forth his approach during the tea break, McGrath stated that their defensive outlook in batting has been one of their biggest problems today. The big names of Australia also couldn’t big anything substantial for the team. Test great Steve Smith had to go back after scoring just one run as Ravi Ashwin brought his A-game on the table.

“That’s been the issue today, they have been very defensive and sitting back, waiting for the bad ball and just taking singles rather than looking a bit more intent and take it to the bowlers and put a little bit of pressure back on the bowlers,” said McGrath as quoted by Sportskeeda.

Though the Indian set up got bundled up too quickly at the start of day two, the bowlers started to dominate in no time. Jasprit Bumrah, Umesh Yadav, and Ravi Ashwin didn’t leave even a bit of room to let Australian batters have the upper hand. The score of visitors would have been even less if the fielders kept their hands tight on some of the catches in between.

When you are not scoring, you would get into trouble very soon: Glenn McGrath

“Indian bowlers have been able to bowl wherever they want, and when you are not scoring, you would get into trouble very soon because, on such a pitch, the wickets will come sooner or later. So if you are not scoring you are not moving anywhere,” McGrath added.

Australians were 41-2 after 25 overs, which was their lowest thing at that stage since the 2004 Test against India at Nagpur. The scoreboard saw 79 runs after the 40 over mark which was again their lowest score in the last 20 years for that stage.