I was asked to fix matches, was threatened if I didn’t comply: Aaqib Javed

I was asked to fix matches, was threatened if I didn’t comply: Aaqib Javed

Javed said that raising voice against match-fixing means, nothing but digging a hole for oneself.

Aaqib Javed
Aaqib Javed (Photo Source: Twitter)

Aaqib Javed, the former Pakistan fast bowler, said that he was once approached for match-fixing. The 47-year-old said that the wrongdoers threatened to finish his career if he didn’t listen to their orders. Javed’s career for the Pakistan spanned 10 years from 1988 to 1998 where he played 22 Tests and 163 ODIs, picking up 54 and 182 wickets respectively.

Recalling the incident, he mentioned that a player was given expensive cars and millions of rupees for fixing games. He said that Saleem Pervez, another former cricketer, was used as a mediator to lure the players into the crime. Parvez played only a solitary ODI against the West Indies in 1980 and passed away on April 24, 2013 at the age of 65.

I took a strong stance and stood by it: Aaqib Javed

“Lavish cars and millions of rupees were handed over to a cricketer. I was also asked to fix matches and was told that if I did not comply, my career would be finished. Players were approached with match-fixing offers through a former cricketer named Saleem Pervez,” Javed was quoted as saying in a local news channel , reported by Cricket Pakistan.

Javed, who’s the head coach of Lahore Qalandars in the Pakistan Super League (PSL), was of the opinion that not falling for the trap led to his career being shortened. The Sheikhupura, Punjab-born said that attempts of sidelining him were made.

“When I came to know about fixing, I took a strong stance and stood by it. I don’t regret the fact that it shortened my career as I strongly believe in my values. People tried to sideline me from tours because of my stance and would also reprimand those people who would talk to me,” Javed said.

Moreover, Javed said that raising voice against match-fixing means, nothing but digging a hole for oneself. “These things [letting players return] encourage those who have been involved with match-fixing. Those who blow the whistle against match-fixers hurt their own careers,” he added.

Pakistan’s relation with match and spot-fixing is an open secret. From the likes of Saleem Malik to Mohammad Amir, Salman Butt, Mohammad Amir and Sharjeel Khan, a number of players have been involved in the act. A few of them also made their comebacks after serving their suspensions.