Advertisement

ICC wants to make sure that no corrupt practices take place during Champions Trophy

Flanagan also said that these days there are various ways to corrupt the cricketers without directly affecting the game’s outcome.

Ronnie Flanagan
ICC anti-corruption chief Sir Ronnie Flanagan. (Photo by Charlie Crowhurst-IDI/IDI via Getty Images)

Chief of ICC’s Anti-Corruption Unit (ACU) Sir Ronnie Flanagan on Thursday made it sure that there are “no specific intelligence” on ideas to corrupt the Champions Trophy but ICC cannot afford to overlook any casualties after all that came to the fore in the second edition of the Pakistan Super League.

5 players were accused of spot-fixing in the PSL and the ICC wants to make sure that an event as prestigious as the Champions Trophy does not come under the scanner for any wrong reasons. The international board does not want to be complacent and be weary of everything.

Advertisement

“No, we don’t have specific intelligence at this stage of intentions to corrupt the tournament, but that doesn’t give us any sense of complacency whatsoever. We saw just very recently in the Pakistan Super League in Dubai instances that we will be guarding against,” ACU chief Flanagan told reporters.

“Easy money leads to corruption”

Flanagan also said that these days there are various ways to corrupt the cricketers without directly affecting the game’s outcome. He explained that easy money draws the players towards wrongdoing, and when one does it, the other follows.

“The attempt to draw players in, try and convince them, look, you can do something that won’t in any way affect the outcome of the game and it’s easy money. All these are tactics that they use to try and draw players in, and then perhaps having drawn one in, use that player as some sort of channel to pollute the atmosphere with some other players,” he said.

ICC doing its best to give no room to wrongdoing in the tournament 

He also revealed another development that the ICC has made is to keep a tap on all contemporary modes of conversations like WhatsApp and other major messengers through which advances are made to cricketers.

Advertisement