It’s not just captains but the entire team will face music for slow over-rates now, reads ICC’s statement

It’s not just captains but the entire team will face music for slow over-rates now, reads ICC’s statement

It added that all players will be equally held responsible for slow over rates and not just the captain(s).

Jason Holder
Jason Holder. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images)

International captains often find themselves at the receiving end when their teams fail to maintain the over rates on time. However, they are set to get some relief as the International Cricket Council (ICC) has now decided to take some other route of penalty. Instead of suspending captains, the international cricket-governing body will now deduct points and fine the entire team for such violations and the new regime will come into force in the upcoming World Test Championship.

The tw0-year-long World Test Championship will start with the Ashes kick-starting on August 1 and the recommendations of the ICC Cricket Committee found approval from its board as a way to curb slow over rates, Sportstar cited agency reports reading, Slowness of games became a major menace during the Indian Premier League earlier this year and on that occasion too, experts like Tom Moody had suggested deduction from net run-rates to make teams buck up.

“In World Test Championship matches a team that is behind the required over rate at the end of a match will have two competition points deducted for each over it is behind,” the ICC said in a statement.

Players will be held equally responsible

It added that all players will be equally held responsible for slow over rates and not just the captain(s) who have to bear the brunt till now. The players will also be slapped with fines at the same level as the captain. Earlier, two instances of slow over-rate in a year would lead to a suspension of the captain.

The ICC has also accepted the committee’s recommendation that use of replays to decide no-balls will be further explored and trials over the same will be conducted in the coming months.

While a bowling side is expected to bowl at the rate of 15 overs an hour in Test matches; it is expected t0 bowl 50 overs within three-and-half hours. In the T20Is, the time limit is 90 minutes. Considerations on grounds of injuries, DRS reviews, sightscreen issues, drink breaks especially long ones in hot days are there but yet the deadline should not be extended too far.