Playing the 2023 World Cup is the ultimate goal: David Warner

Playing the 2023 World Cup is the ultimate goal: David Warner

At the present point in time, Warner has no complaints surrounding his fitness.

David Warner
David Warner. (Photo Source: Twitter)

David Warner, the Australian batsman, has set his eyes on the 2023 edition of the World Cup, which is scheduled to take place in India. When the mega event takes place, the New South Wales-born will be nearing the age of 37 and there could be a chance that he doesn’t remain the batter he used to be in his prime. But of late, he has sounded pretty confident about his fitness goals.

Warner quipped that at the present point in time, he is feeling ‘fit as a fiddle’, which he feels has helped him in running between the wickets. Ever since March 2018, the southpaw has had quite a bit of time off. To start with, he didn’t play international cricket for a year due to the ball-tampering saga.

Then he made a resounding comeback in the 2019 World Cup where he smashed three centuries against Pakistan, Bangladesh and South Africa with a top score of 166. Currently, he doesn’t have any cricket to play due to the coronavirus pandemic across the globe.

I’m feeling as fit as a fiddle: David Warner

“In the last three years I’ll have had almost two years off, depending on when we play cricket again,” the left-handed Warner was quoted as saying in cricket.com.au. “The longevity in your body helps. The get ups of training and playing gets harder as you get older but I haven’t felt any fitter in my career than I do now.”

“As the legs get older time will tell. At the moment I’m feeling as fit as a fiddle and if I can keep running between wickets as well as I have done, who knows. That (2023 ODI) World Cup is the ultimate goal,” he stated.

When Warner made his T20I debut back in 2009, he didn’t have experience of playing first-class cricket. But gradually, the 33-year-old has moulded himself into a versatile cricketer. With him into his mid-30s, Warner knows the importance of youngsters getting enough chances.

“There’s back-to-back Twenty20 World Cups, and I started my career with Twenty20 cricket, and I think it’s important we’ve got younger kids coming through and they get a sniff and a chance of playing at this level as well,” he added.