Reports: Cricket Australia communicates to ICC that it couldn’t identify the ones involved in racial abuses during the SCG Test

Reports: Cricket Australia communicates to ICC that it couldn’t identify the ones involved in racial abuses during the SCG Test

Earlier, the Board of Control for Cricket in India lodged an official complaint after which CA issued an apology.

Mohammed Siraj with security officials
Mohammed Siraj with security officials. (Photo Source: Getty Images)

Cricket Australia has told the International Cricket Council that it couldn’t identify the ones, who hurled racial abuses at the Indian players during the third Test of the Border Gavaskar Trophy at the Sydney Cricket Ground. During the SCG Test, Mohammed Siraj and a few visitors’ players had to endure racial discrimination and the situation took an ugly turn.

During the game, six spectators were evicted from the ground after Siraj complained to the umpires about the abuses. The incident created a lot of ruckus in the cricket fraternity and it halted play for quite a while when the match officials and umpires were trying to find a solution.

ICC gave Cricket Australia 14 days to make the investigations

However, as per reports in The Age, the CA investigators “have cleared the six men ejected from their seats during the Sydney Test of racially abusing Mohammed Siraj.” Cricket Australia has forwarded the findings to the ICC after an investigation. CA was given 14 days to delve deep into the matter and come to a decision.

“CA, which is awaiting a final report from NSW Police, is satisfied that the six men who were walked out of the lower tier of the Clive Churchill and Brewongle stand by police on the fourth afternoon of the Test did not make remarks of a racial nature to players,” the newspaper was quoted as saying, reported by Times Now.

“The report (of CA to the ICC) says while they believed players had been racially abused, CA investigators were unable to identify the culprits,” the newspaper said.

Earlier, the Board of Control for Cricket in India lodged an official complaint after which CA issued an apology. The newspaper stated that multiple Indian players were interviewed, and spectators were also used as witnesses.

“Sources now say the Indians had warned on the ground that they wouldn’t resume play until their complaint was acted upon. CA was told the men were singing to Siraj, who after complaining to umpires then pointed in their direction when police arrived,” the newspaper added.

Amidst the controversy, the Sydney Test was a witness to some jaw-dropping display of cricket, though the game ended in a draw. Steve Smith becoming the Player of the Match, Rishabh Pant’s 97 and Hanuma Vihari and Ravi Ashwin’s grit enthralled the crowd.