'Sometimes it just feels like we are caged circus animals' - Tabraiz Shamsi speaks on trauma of bio bubble life

‘Sometimes it just feels like we are caged circus animals’ – Tabraiz Shamsi speaks on trauma of bio bubble life

Prior to this, the ECB chief had also opened up about the player's mental health.

Tabraiz Shamsi of South Africa celebrates the dismissal of Shimron Hetmyer of West Indies
Tabraiz Shamsi of South Africa celebrates the dismissal of Shimron Hetmyer of the West Indies. (Photo by RANDY BROOKS/AFP via Getty Images)

Amidst the challenging and tough times of the ongoing pandemic, cricket is carried out in bio-secure environments. Though the protocols are followed, the uncertainties of the virus have been affecting the matches as COVID cases have reportedly hit the camps. However, South Africa’s spinner Tabraiz Shamsi has opened up about life in the bubble and how it takes a toll on the players more often than not.

It is quite understood that staying in the bio-bubble for a longer time due to matches is a herculean task for the players. The strict regulations do not allow them to move around and that in turn affects their mental conditions. Echoing similar sentiments, Shamsi has revealed that it has a great impact on the players’ life when they are on tours.

“I don’t think everyone truly understands the impact these things have on us, our families, and our lives outside of cricket. Sometimes it just feels like we are caged circus animals who only get taken outside when it’s time to practice and play matches to entertain the crowds.” Shamsi tweeted.

Tabraiz Shamsi has been in the bio-secure environment for consecutive series

Shamsi has been a part of the South African team which played a 5 match T20I series against the West Indies which the visitors won 3-2. Post that the Proteas took the charge of the field to face Ireland in a 3 matches ODI series that resulted in a tie. Thus after having played in consecutive series recently and lived the bubble life, Shamsi spoke about the experience of being in such an environment through Twitter.

Before this, the England and Wales Cricket Board’s (ECB) chief had also opened up about the player’s mental health. Both international and domestic cricket in England had been affected due to the surge of the COVID-19 pandemic. India’s Rishabh Pant and one support staff too tested positive for the virus ahead of the practice game in Durham. However, despite this, Tom Harrison, the ECB’s chief executive, had said on Thursday that the board had decided to ease out on certain restrictions considering the mental space of the players.

“We want people feeling good about going out and playing in whatever tournament they’re playing in, whether that’s the Hundred, whether that’s a Test series against India, whether that is county cricket and the RL50. We don’t want to be closeting players in such a place where they feel like the only role they play in their life is to go out and bat and bowl for whatever team they’re playing” Harrison said as reported by ESPNcricinfo.