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Stuart Broad’s dismissal of Paul Stirling in England-Ireland Test makes ‘celebrappeal’ highly searched term

Broad took three wickets. England then did well to score 303 runs in their second innings losing nine wickets at stumps on Day 2.

Stuart Broad
Stuart Broad. (Photo by Shaun Botterill/Getty Images)

Waiting for the umpire’s decision after appealing for dismissal is a common sight in cricket. No matter how genuine the dismissal is, the bowler and fielders have to wait for that few seconds for the umpire to agree with them and raise his finger dreaded by the batsman.

There are even funny stories related to the umpire’s raising the finger. Once, an Indian bowler was so frustrated with an overseas umpire while playing abroad since he was not lifting his finger even over appeals that seemed genuine, he asked the official whether it was out after castling the batsman. No partiality, please!

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But there is another form of dismissal where the bowler doesn’t care to wait for the umpire’s decision because he is very confident about the dismissal and starts celebrating moments within appealing. Such a dismissal is termed ‘celebrappeal’ which is appealing for and celebrating a dismissal at the same time without even looking back at the umpire.

Such a ‘celebrappeal’ moment was witnessed during the one-off Test match which is underway at Lord’s between England Ireland. England spearheaded Stuart Broad trapped Ireland No.4 Paul Stirling in the 34th over of the innings to cut short a partnership of 87 runs between him (36) and Andrew Balbirnie (55) that looked menacing.

Broad has done it earlier as well

‘Celebrappeal’ became a popular term on the Internet after the dismissal as people looked for its meaning. However, for Broad who has over 430 wickets in Tests, this is not the first time he engaged in celebrappeal. In 2017, he had similarly dismissed West Indies‘ Roston Chase by getting him in front of the wicket.

England, who won the cricket World Cup at the same venue on July 14, had a harsh reality check when two-Test old Ireland bundled them for 85 in the first innings and Joe Root won the toss and elected to bat. Tim Murtagh took five wickets for 13 to be the destroyer in chief. England then stopped Ireland from taking a huge lead by bowling them out for 207 after they were cruising at 132 for 2.

Broad took three wickets. England then did well to score 303 runs in their second innings losing nine wickets at stumps on Day 2. They have now an overall lead of 181 runs. Two more days are left in the game as it’s a four-day affair.

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