'Time for him to leave the game' - Lisa Sthalekar slams Geoffrey Boycott for his take on women commentators

‘Time for him to leave the game’ – Lisa Sthalekar slams Geoffrey Boycott for his take on women commentators

According to Sthalekar, Boycott was dissing his own industry which he has been a part of.

Lisa Sthalekar and Geoffrey Boycott
Lisa Sthalekar and Geoffrey Boycott. (Photo Source: Getty Images)

Former England skipper Geoffrey Boycott sparked controversy after he published a controversial column in the London Telegraph, in the wake of ending his 14-year long association with BBC’s Test Match Special commentary team. Boycott cited COVID-19 pandemic as the reason behind his departure ahead of England’s home series against West Indies.

Meanwhile, Boycott, in his column, insisted that only men who have played Test cricket should be “expert” commentators in Test cricket coverage. His comment irked many fans including cricketer-turned-commentator Lisa Sthalekar. With the emergence of women in the broadcasting field, Boycott’s comment was slammed by many people of the fraternity.

“You have to know the pressure, emotions and technique required and I do not believe you can learn that from reading a book or because you played club cricket, second XI cricket or, with great respect, women’s cricket. As good as the women are at their game, it bears no resemblance to the power and pace of men’s cricket,” Boycott wrote in his column.

Cricket is a sport literally for all shapes and sizes: Lisa Sthalekar

Lisa Sthalekar, who has become a massive presence across the cricket commentary scenario, hit back at Boycott and said that it was time for him to leave the game. According to Sthalekar, Boycott was dissing his own industry which he has been a part of.

“He is actually dissing the industry he has been a part of for a long period of time. It’s time for him to leave the game and let’s remember him as a great cricketer of a certain generation. Talk about power – I didn’t see much power that he displayed.

“Let’s call up his strike rate and look at some of the numbers compared to female Test cricketers of even that generation. I think some of the female cricketers would have had a better strike rate than he did,” said Sthalekar.

Sthalekar also said that cricket, as a sport, is for all shapes and sizes, for everyone, regardless of gender, and nothing should stop people from sharing their opinions on the game.

“Cricket is a sport literally for all shapes and sizes, for everyone, regardless of gender. Everyone loves the game so why can’t everyone share opinions on broadcasts that are from a diverse background, whether that be different countries, different genders because that is what is happening in the living room when we are all watching and listening to the radio,” said Sthalekar.