Pat Cummins suggests two modifications in current DRS rule

Pat Cummins suggests two modifications in current DRS rule

Cummins questioned that why the bails are not included in the hitting zone while checking for LBW.

Pat Cummins
Pat Cummins. (Photo by SAEED KHAN/AFP /AFP via Getty Images)

The debate around the Decision Review System (DRS) is always on among the cricket experts in the world. DRS and the role of ‘Umpire’s call’ in the same are always among the hot topics in the cricket fraternity on which people have divided opinions. In the same reference, Australian pacer Pat Cummins voiced his opinion against the DRS system and stated that it always gives a disadvantage to bowlers. Cummins added that LBW calls are always on the side of batsmen when it comes to the final decision.

In a recent while, many cricketers have suggested removing the ‘umpire’s call’ from the DRS as it gives a lot of inconsistency in decision making. Also, if a clear-cut technology signals the batsman out, the umpire shouldn’t be given an upper hand in the case. Talking in the same light, Cummins suggested two changes in the current DRS and also questioned that why the bails are not included in the hitting zone while checking for LBW.

“They measure the 50 percent of the ball not from the top of the bail, but from the line you see from the top of the stump. So you almost need 70 percent of the ball. It brings down the area you’ve got to be hitting the stumps to quite small. It almost has to be a half-volley for someone who’s quite tall, or you have to be bowling so straight from stump to stump,” said Cummins in a chat with Fox Sports.

Pat Cummins on DRS related to caught behind

The Australian star added that bails not being included in the hitting zone have a lot to do with the bowlers who get a lot of bounce on their soil like Nathan Lyon. Even if the ball is hitting the bails, which are a part of stumps, the decision cannot be overruled and will depend a lot on the umpire’s call. The pacer also added that a DRS should be retained with the team if there’s a close call in caught behind just like it happens in LBW.

“I understand it’s there for the howler, they keep saying. But I don’t understand why then nicks behind are so black and white. I know he’s either nicked it or he hasn’t, but there are times where you’re not 100 percent whether snicko lines up or you can’t say for certain whether he’s copped glove,” he added.