Quarantine Edition, Part 2: Five biggest myths heard in cricket

Quarantine Edition, Part 2: Five biggest myths heard in cricket

Here are five facts of cricket which have been misguiding the fanatics of cricket.

Virender Sehwag
Virender Sehwag. (Photo Source: Twitter)

In our second part of Quarantine edition, we try to find few facts in cricket which have been wrongly projected towards the fans of the sport. In the generation of social media, there is a great possibility of spreading facts way too quickly irrespective of the accuracy. Some of those facts have been clinical in modifying perspectives around a given player. In this article, we picked out five famous myths in cricket which are believed by a majority despite a lot of evidence being against them.

Here are five facts of cricket which have been misguiding cricket fanatics:

5. Sir Don Bradman performed on sticky tracks

Don Bradman in 1930. (Photo by Central Press/Getty Images)

The playing conditions in early days of Test cricket were deemed to be toughest as most of the pitches remained uncovered. This would mean that the tracks would become sticky whenever it rains. There is a wide range of acceptance that Sir Donald Bradman managed to be successful on such pitches which ensured him finishing with a batting average close to 100.

However, the ‘Beyond a Boundary’ book by CLR James disapproves the statement of Bradman’s excellence on sticky pitches. James carried out a comparison between top batting names during Bradman’s era and their performances on sticky tracks. It was revealed that the Australian legendary batsman could only average 20.29 on such pitches.

Across 15 Test innings on sticky pitches, Bradman amassed only 284 runs with help of one fifty. He was dismissed four times for a duck in such conditions but only three times in the remaining 65 innings. Bradman scored 6712 runs at an impressive average of 119.9 on non-sticky tracks.

Page 1 / 5
Next